Grade 1 Winning Owner Profiles

Telling the stories behind a selection of owners who won Grade 1 races this spring.  By Bill Heller  Dr. Joel Politi -  Serengeti Empress   Challenges have defined Dr. Joel Politi’s life. Feeling constricted while working in a small practice as an orthopedic surgeon in Columbus, Ohio, he helped form Orthopedic ONE, the largest physician-owned orthopedic and sports medicine practice in the state, in 2016. “We’ve taken our small group and merged with other groups,” he said. “I’ve been a managing partner. I’m very proud of it.”  Think live TV is a challenge? Politi allows his surgeries to be live-streamed to the local science center COSI (Center of Science Industry), which sends the signal via the Library Science Center in Jersey City to six high schools around the country. Politi estimates the program, called “Surgical Suite,” has cumulatively reached more than 300,000 high school students who are building careers in medicine the last 15 years.  “It’s live and I have a microphone on me,” he said. “I narrate the operation to them and field questions.”  At the end of the surgery, he introduces everyone—nurses, surgical technicians, anesthesiologists, medical device representatives and physicians’ assistants—and each one describes his or her role, training and education they received to get to this point.  “He’s not only a very successful surgeon, he’s developed tools for others,” his Thoroughbred trainer Tom Amoss said. “He’s a giver. He’s not just a client, he’s a friend.”  In his lifestyle as a newly-minted 50-year-old who is thrilled to be blessed with four daughters, Rachel (22), Leah (20), Annie (18) and Nina (14), Politi and his wife Julie have challenged themselves by running in five marathons and more than 20 half-marathons. “We run together and talk together the whole time,” he said. “We’re not winning any races, but it’s kind of our sanity.” Just to make the challenge of long-distance running a bit more daunting, they’ve signed up to do a half-Ironman: a 1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike race and then a half marathon (13.1 miles). “I’ll see if I’m still alive after that,” he laughed.  But the deepest-rooted challenge in Politi’s life is Thoroughbred racing, tracing back to the days he shared with his late father Jacques, a pediatric allergist who had a 12-horse barn of Thoroughbreds in their backyard. “My priorities are work, family, exercise and then horse racing,” Politi said. “But I love horse racing. I grew up with a barn in my backyard. I’d get the newspaper every day just to see the horses running at Thistledown and Waterford Park (now Mountaineer). In the winter, we used to drive an hour Friday night to get the Racing Form just to look at before we went to the track at Thistledown the next day. I was 12, or 13. I got into it. I really got into it.”  Politi and his three older siblings, Diane, June and John, earned 25 cents to feed the horses each morning, and they spent as much time as possible watching them race. Most, but not all of those Thoroughbreds were low-end claimers. “We had $1,500 claimers at Waterford and Thistledown,” Politi said. “That’s where I grew up. My dad owned and bred a bunch of Ohio-bred stakes winners. That was a really big accomplishment, especially with a home-bred. I said, `Wouldn’t it be great to win a little stakes?’”  That challenge wasn’t addressed until Politi became a Thoroughbred owner. “In 2005, I put together my first partnership with a bunch of friends,” he said. “We called it Giddy-Up Stables, from Kramer’s line in a Seinfeld episode. We claimed two horses with Bernie Flint.”  Serengeti Empress, whom Politi purchased for $70,000 as a yearling at Keeneland in 2017, took Politi to another level, when winning Politi his first Gr1 triumph, when she captured the Gr1 Kentucky Oaks by a length and three-quarters.  “I don’t know if I’ve recovered from it,” Politi said three weeks after the Oaks. “I would say it’s the greatest thrill—that race, that win. I’d love for her to win a bunch more races (she then finished second after an awkward start in the Gr1 Acorn at Belmont Park), but winning that race that day was a dream come true...a true dream come true.”  Politi acknowledged he’s come a long way from Waterford Park: “Oh my gosh, yeah.”  **********************************************************  Bill and Corrine Heiligbrodt -  Mitole  and co-owners of  Mia Mischief   Let’s face it. Bill and Corrine Heiligbrodt did just an awful job of getting out of the Thoroughbred business in 2011. Eight years after their dispersal sale, they enjoyed an afternoon at Churchill Downs few owners could even imagine. They won two Gr 1 stakes on Kentucky Derby Day, the Churchill Down Stakes with Mitole and, in partnership with Heider Family Stable and Sol Kumin’s Madaket Stables, the Humana Distaff with Mia Mischief.  “It’s pretty hard to win a Gr1 race, so winning two in an hour and a half was pretty good for a cowboy like me,” Bill Heiligbrodt said.  Who could imagine another incredible thrill awaited them when Mitole stretched his winning streak to seven by taking the Gr1 Met Mile with perhaps the deepest field the gloried stakes has ever offered, at Belmont Park on June 8?  Good thing the cowboy got back into racing, right?  In July 2011, the Heiligbrodts sold 80 broodmares, horses of racing age, yearlings, a stallion, and, in a separate dispersal sale, 12 foals. The decision wasn’t made lightly because the Heiligbrodts, bridged to Hall of Fame trainer Steve Asmussen, had been consistently successful, finishing in the top 10 leading owners nationally every year from 2007 through 2010. They campaigned, either on their own or in partnerships, 118 stakes winners, including 45 graded stakes winners. None were better than Lady Tak, who won multiple Gr1 stakes, including the Ballerina when she set a track record at Saratoga, and earned more than $1 million with 10 victories from 19 starts before being retired and sold in 2005.  Asked why he got out of racing eight years earlier, Heiligbrodt said in June, “I wasn’t a youngster. “My children were going in different directions. I thought that it was a good thing for me. I always enjoyed the racing, but I had been involved in breeding. I decided to sell it all.”  But horses had always been in his life growing up in Bay City, Texas. “There were 7,000 to 8,000 people there back then, basically ranchers and farmers,” he said.  Heiligbrodt met his lifelong partner Corrine, in high school, where they became sweethearts. “We were together in high school and then in college,” he said. They’re still sweethearts. “I think the big thing is we enjoy the same things,” Heiligbrodt said.  Dreaming of playing football at the University of Texas, Heiligbrodt was recruited in high school by legendary UT Coach Darrell Royal and received a full scholarship. “You played both ways then,” he said. “I was a running back, split end, defensive end and defensive halfback. Of Royal, Heiligbrodt said, “He was a great individual—a very good judge of people and a very good judge of talent.”  Heiligbrodt started on the freshman team, but an injury brought a premature end to his football career, though he remained on full scholarship through his final year.  After finishing graduate school, Heiligbrodt moved to California, taking a job with United California Bank. “I went to work in California and went to the races in California,” he said. “I liked it. We went a lot. I did handicapping. I got thoroughly indoctrinated in that.”  He returned to Texas in 1967 to work for Texas Commerce Bank in Houston, where he would eventually become a vice-chairman.  Twenty years later, he took a job with United Service Corp International, one of his bank’s former customers. He became president and CEO before leaving to work for two other companies until he retired in 2015.  He’d been involved with horses much earlier, using Quarter Horses in cutting—a western-style equestrian event with horses and riders working together as a team to handle cattle before a judge or a panel of judges.  “Then I got involved with a Thoroughbred trainer looking to race in Kentucky, Arkansas and Louisiana,” he said. “I got involved and I liked it. My wife and I picked our own horses. The kids were working in the business. It was a family business.”  They didn’t need a long time to pick out their racing silks: white and burnt orange, the colors of the University of Texas. “We’re pretty big Texas fans,” he said. “She’s the only one who bleeds more orange than me. She’s pretty tough, too.”  The Heiligbrodts bought their first Thoroughbred, Appealing Breeze, in 1989 and he won more stakes than any two-year-old in the country that year. But in the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile, he was hit in the eye by a chip of a rock and missed nearly a year before returning to finish his career, earning more than $600,000.  Despite ongoing success, the Heiligbrodts got out of the business in 2011. Fortunately for them, it didn’t take. “I couldn’t resist getting back into racing,” Heiligbrodt said.  Asmussen has said that he may have saddled more than 1,000 winners for the Heiligbrodts. And if Asmussen surpasses Dale Baird for most career victories in the history of racing, he’ll have the Heiligbrodts to thank.  That’s not bad for a cowboy.  *************************************************  Gatto Racing and All Schlaich Stables -  Vasilika   Nick Gatto’s journey in horse racing began with a bucket of fried chicken he’d share with his father at Del Mar, 15 miles from their home in Encinitas, Calif. “I grew up going to Del Mar with my dad and a bucket of KFC ever since I could walk, or before I could walk,” Nick said. “My dad in college, he always joked around that he wanted to own a racehorse. My dad was a CPA. He was a numbers guy. He and a close friend, Jim Cahill, claimed a horse named Senator Maddy with trainer Ed Moger Jr. in 2008. An $8,000 claimer, he won a couple of races for us, and we became hooked for life.”  With both his father and Cahill still working regular jobs (Cahill worked in retail with PriceSmart), they turned to Nick for help. “They didn’t really have the time to manage their horses,” Nick said. “They gave me the responsibility of working with Ed Moger. Then we dipped our toes in the water and got a two-year-old with Jeff Mullins. She became a winner. We started to accumulate a bankroll. We were profitable, and we kept rolling with it.”  Soon, Nick had to make the most important decision of his life. “My dad’s good friend, Will DeBurgh had Tuscan Evening, a successful horse with Jerry Hollendorfer,” Nick said. “I met with them. I asked, `How do I get more involved?’ Will mentioned that Taylor Made had an internship program. I was working as a local EMT for the fire department. I decided I wanted to pursue a career in racing more than I wanted to be a firefighter.”  Nick, now 34, completed the internship program at Taylor Made and then took an offer to stay, working there three years and eventually becoming a barn foreman. Then he worked for trainer Matt Chew at Del Mar one summer. Nick then worked for Jenny Craig before turning his attention full-time to form and then operate Gatto Racing with his partner, Mark Schlaich.  If Schlaich tells you a horse is a lock, take him up on it. He runs a locksmith company in Northern California with three shops and 30 employees. He slipped into the lock business after racing motorcycles and working in a flower shop. “I’m very mechanical,” Schlaich said. Schlaich, 58, got to know Nick through Nick’s father.  In 2018, credit Nick, his father and Schlaich for not getting lost in the moment when their horse War Moccasin got claimed for $40,000 at Santa Anita in her first start as a four-year-old in 2018. Trainer/co-owner Jerry Hollendorfer and his partner George Todero claimed Vasilika for $40,000 in that same race. “Jerry gave me the opportunity to go in on her,” Nick said. “Dan Ward, Jerry’s assistant, takes his job very seriously. He doesn’t smile that much. When he claimed this mare, he smiled at me. So I knew I had to jump aboard. I told Jerry, `Absolutely. Thank you.’”  They haven’t looked back as Vasilika has turned into a once-in-a-lifetime claim. Her victory in the Gr1 Gamely Stakes at Santa Anita May 27 was her 12th victory in 14 starts since that claim. “When Jerry got her, he put some weight on her and spaced her races,” Nick said. “She was entered in the November sale last year, but we decided to race her another year.”  Smart move. She is four-for-four this year with that Gr1, a pair of Gr2 and a Gr3 stakes score, but it’s been a bittersweet journey for Nick, still trying to heal after his dad died in January at the age of 64. “He was at a golf tournament following Phil Mickelson,” Nick said. “My mother was with him. He had a heart attack when he was on the golf course. This ride with Vasilika has been very emotional. It was very difficult. It still is. What this mare has brought us after losing my dad. He couldn’t have this ride with her.”  Mark Schlaich said, “Nick and his dad were extremely close. Always very supporting and loving. He’s still processing the loss of his father.”  Nick's wife Karla handles all the stable's book work while also caring for their two young children. Nick has long-time partners in Schlaich, Hollendorfer and George Todero. “It’s been great to have a partnership that has been together for so many years,” Nick said. “We’re riding this wave together. That’s what partners do.”  Especially when one of them is gone.  ********************************************************  Whispering Oaks, Bradley Thoroughbreds, Jay Hanley, Sal Kumin’s Madaket Stables and Tim and Anna Cambron -  She’s a Julie   How do a Louisiana owner breeder, a man who grew up on a cattle ranch in Northern California, a couple who hit it big with a jewelry store in Knoxville, Tenn., a sign business from Versailles, Ky., a homebuilder from Nantucket, Mass. and a businessman from Boston wind up celebrating a Gr1 stakes victory together as owners?  “That’s what horses can do,” Peter Bradley of Bradley Thoroughbreds said.  He should know. He organized the partnership of Nantucket’s Jay Hanley and Sol Kumin’s Madaket Stables, his Bradley Thoroughbreds and sign makers Tim and Anna Cambron, who now own a sign company in Versailles, Ky., that purchased a 75% interest in She’s a Julie, who was owned by Carrol Castille’s Whispering Oaks Farm in Louisiana. Whispering Oaks maintained a 25% interest in She’s a Julie, the five-year-old mare who won the Gr1 La Troienne Stakes on Kentucky Oaks Day at Churchill Downs.  Castille, 52, grew up with horses. His father was a trainer. Besides Whispering Oaks, Castille has a tack shop and is involved in the communication tower business. Castille moved his stable to Phyllis Comeaux’s breeding facility last August. Comeaux is the manager of Whispering Oaks. “It’s working out really well,” Comeaux said.  She’s a Julie has, too. Her trainer, Steve Asmussen, bought the filly for Whispering Oaks at the 2016 September Keeneland Yearling Sale for $160,000, and she has done little wrong in her entire career, posting six victories, two seconds and one third in 13 starts with nearly $900,000 in earnings.  “I’d seen her as a yearling and I loved her,” Bradley said. “I followed her career.”  Bradley’s career and life began on his grandparents’ and parents’ ranch in Northern California. He went to the University of California-Davis, studying agricultural economics. When his family sold the ranch, Bradley went to work for trainer Gene Cleveland at Santa Anita and Hollywood Park, working his way up from groom to assistant trainer in three years. “I decided I had to go to Kentucky,” he said. “I moved to Kentucky and started pinhooking, and I’ve been here since 1981.”  After She’s a Julie won the Gr3 Iowa Oaks at Prairie Meadows on July 5, 2018, Bradley heard from a friend that Castille might be interested in selling a piece. He knew just whom to call and put together a group that bought 75% of the star mare. And he couldn’t be more thrilled with the mare. “She’s not only won a Gr1, but she’s placed in a Gr1,” he said. “The Gr1’s are always so exceptional. She tries with every inch of her body. She’s really an interesting filly. She’s like a pet in the barn. But on the track, she has this determination—this heart. We love to see that in our horses. I didn’t know Carrol or his wife Stacey beforehand, but they’ve been great partners.”  Bradley knew everyone else.  Tim and Anna Cambron, the president and CFO of Ruggles Sign Company in Versailles, met Bradley through their CPA, who had an office down the hall from Bradley’s office in Lexington. “He mentioned that if we ever want to get interested in Thoroughbreds, he was the guy to call,” Anna said. “We thought about it for a while. We grew up near Keeneland. We decided to dip our toes in it in 2015. Our very first horse was Dacita.”  Dacita won the Gr2 Ballston Spa Stakes that year in Saratoga, quite an accomplishment for rookie owners. She’s a Julie has done even more.  “It’s been a lot of fun,” Anna said. “It’s not an inexpensive hobby. We really enjoy going to the racetrack, meeting the partners, hanging around the barn, talking to the trainers a little bit, getting to meet the jockeys, getting on the inside a little bit. Our friends who have been in the horse industry for many years tell us, `You’ve been very lucky.’ But we feel we associated ourselves with good people.”  Hanley and Kumin are two of them. Hanley, originally from San Francisco, operates Hanley Development in Nantucket. He had already teamed with Boston businessman Sol Kumin (and two silent partners) to form Sheep Pond Partners. Hanley and Kumin met when Kumin hired Hanley to work on his home in Nantucket, which was located on Sheep Pond Road.  Hanley and Kumin have won Gr1 stakes before. But it’s a new thrill for the Castilles. “We alternate our silks with She’s a Julie, and she won the La Troienne in Carrol’s silks,” Bradley said.  He was thrilled to see Castille win his first Gr1. So was Comeaux, Whispering Oaks Manager: “I was at the farm. I was home. I got a real good seat by myself. I was happy for Carrol. With all the people in the racing industry who would love to have a Gr1, a lot never get a taste of it—never got close to that. People dream of it. He got to experience it.”

By Bill Heller

Telling the stories behind a selection of owners who won Grade 1 races this spring. 

  Dr. Joel Politi - Serengeti Empress

Challenges have defined Dr. Joel Politi’s life. Feeling constricted while working in a small practice as an orthopedic surgeon in Columbus, Ohio, he helped form Orthopedic ONE, the largest physician-owned orthopedic and sports medicine practice in the state, in 2016. “We’ve taken our small group and merged with other groups,” he said. “I’ve been a managing partner. I’m very proud of it.”

Think live TV is a challenge? Politi allows his surgeries to be live-streamed to the local science center COSI (Center of Science Industry), which sends the signal via the Library Science Center in Jersey City to six high schools around the country. Politi estimates the program, called “Surgical Suite,” has cumulatively reached more than 300,000 high school students who are building careers in medicine the last 15 years.

“It’s live and I have a microphone on me,” he said. “I narrate the operation to them and field questions.” 

At the end of the surgery, he introduces everyone—nurses, surgical technicians, anesthesiologists, medical device representatives and physicians’ assistants—and each one describes his or her role, training and education they received to get to this point.

“He’s not only a very successful surgeon, he’s developed tools for others,” his Thoroughbred trainer Tom Amoss said. “He’s a giver. He’s not just a client, he’s a friend.”

In his lifestyle as a newly-minted 50-year-old who is thrilled to be blessed with four daughters, Rachel (22), Leah (20), Annie (18) and Nina (14), Politi and his wife Julie have challenged themselves by running in five marathons and more than 20 half-marathons. “We run together and talk together the whole time,” he said. “We’re not winning any races, but it’s kind of our sanity.” Just to make the challenge of long-distance running a bit more daunting, they’ve signed up to do a half-Ironman: a 1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike race and then a half marathon (13.1 miles). “I’ll see if I’m still alive after that,” he laughed.

But the deepest-rooted challenge in Politi’s life is Thoroughbred racing, tracing back to the days he shared with his late father Jacques, a pediatric allergist who had a 12-horse barn of Thoroughbreds in their backyard. “My priorities are work, family, exercise and then horse racing,” Politi said. “But I love horse racing. I grew up with a barn in my backyard. I’d get the newspaper every day just to see the horses running at Thistledown and Waterford Park (now Mountaineer). In the winter, we used to drive an hour Friday night to get the Racing Form just to look at before we went to the track at Thistledown the next day. I was 12, or 13. I got into it. I really got into it.”

Serengeti Empress

Serengeti Empress

Politi and his three older siblings, Diane, June and John, earned 25 cents to feed the horses each morning, and they spent as much time as possible watching them race. Most, but not all of those Thoroughbreds were low-end claimers. “We had $1,500 claimers at Waterford and Thistledown,” Politi said. “That’s where I grew up. My dad owned and bred a bunch of Ohio-bred stakes winners. That was a really big accomplishment, especially with a home-bred. I said, `Wouldn’t it be great to win a little stakes?’”

That challenge wasn’t addressed until Politi became a Thoroughbred owner. “In 2005, I put together my first partnership with a bunch of friends,” he said. “We called it Giddy-Up Stables, from Kramer’s line in a Seinfeld episode. We claimed two horses with Bernie Flint.”

Serengeti Empress, whom Politi purchased for $70,000 as a yearling at Keeneland in 2017, took Politi to another level, when winning Politi his first Gr1 triumph, when she captured the Gr1 Kentucky Oaks by a length and three-quarters.

“I don’t know if I’ve recovered from it,” Politi said three weeks after the Oaks. “I would say it’s the greatest thrill—that race, that win. I’d love for her to win a bunch more races (she then finished second after an awkward start in the Gr1 Acorn at Belmont Park), but winning that race that day was a dream come true...a true dream come true.”

Politi acknowledged he’s come a long way from Waterford Park: “Oh my gosh, yeah.”

**********************************************************

Bill and Corrine Heiligbrodt - Mitole and co-owners of Mia Mischief

Let’s face it. Bill and Corrine Heiligbrodt did just an awful job of getting out of the Thoroughbred business in 2011. Eight years after their dispersal sale, they enjoyed an afternoon at Churchill Downs few owners could even imagine. They won two Gr 1 stakes on Kentucky Derby Day, the Churchill Down Stakes with Mitole and, in partnership with Heider Family Stable and Sol Kumin’s Madaket Stables, the Humana Distaff with Mia Mischief.

“It’s pretty hard to win a Gr1 race, so winning two in an hour and a half was pretty good for a cowboy like me,” Bill Heiligbrodt said.

Mitole

Mitole

Who could imagine another incredible thrill awaited them when Mitole stretched his winning streak to seven by taking the Gr1 Met Mile with perhaps the deepest field the gloried stakes has ever offered, at Belmont Park on June 8?

Good thing the cowboy got back into racing, right?

In July 2011, the Heiligbrodts sold 80 broodmares, horses of racing age, yearlings, a stallion, and, in a separate dispersal sale, 12 foals. The decision wasn’t made lightly because the Heiligbrodts, bridged to Hall of Fame trainer Steve Asmussen, had been consistently successful, finishing in the top 10 leading owners nationally every year from 2007 through 2010. They campaigned, either on their own or in partnerships, 118 stakes winners, including 45 graded stakes winners. None were better than Lady Tak, who won multiple Gr1 stakes, including the Ballerina when she set a track record at Saratoga, and earned more than $1 million with 10 victories from 19 starts before being retired and sold in 2005.

Asked why he got out of racing eight years earlier, Heiligbrodt said in June, “I wasn’t a youngster. “My children were going in different directions. I thought that it was a good thing for me. I always enjoyed the racing, but I had been involved in breeding. I decided to sell it all.”

But horses had always been in his life growing up in Bay City, Texas. “There were 7,000 to 8,000 people there back then, basically ranchers and farmers,” he said. 

Corinne and L. William Heiligbrodt

Corinne and L. William Heiligbrodt

Heiligbrodt met his lifelong partner Corrine, in high school, where they became sweethearts. “We were together in high school and then in college,” he said. They’re still sweethearts. “I think the big thing is we enjoy the same things,” Heiligbrodt said.

Dreaming of playing football at the University of Texas, Heiligbrodt was recruited in high school by legendary UT Coach Darrell Royal and received a full scholarship. “You played both ways then,” he said. “I was a running back, split end, defensive end and defensive halfback. Of Royal, Heiligbrodt said, “He was a great individual—a very good judge of people and a very good judge of talent.”

Heiligbrodt started on the freshman team, but an injury brought a premature end to his football career, though he remained on full scholarship through his final year.

After finishing graduate school, Heiligbrodt moved to California, taking a job with United California Bank. “I went to work in California and went to the races in California,” he said. “I liked it. We went a lot. I did handicapping. I got thoroughly indoctrinated in that.”

He returned to Texas in 1967 to work for Texas Commerce Bank in Houston, where he would eventually become a vice-chairman. 

Twenty years later, he took a job with United Service Corp International, one of his bank’s former customers. He became president and CEO before leaving to work for two other companies until he retired in 2015.

He’d been involved with horses much earlier, using Quarter Horses in cutting—a western-style equestrian event with horses and riders working together as a team to handle cattle before a judge or a panel of judges.

“Then I got involved with a Thoroughbred trainer looking to race in Kentucky, Arkansas and Louisiana,” he said. “I got involved and I liked it. My wife and I picked our own horses. The kids were working in the business. It was a family business.”

They didn’t need a long time to pick out their racing silks: white and burnt orange, the colors of the University of Texas. “We’re pretty big Texas fans,” he said. “She’s the only one who bleeds more orange than me. She’s pretty tough, too.”

The Heiligbrodts bought their first Thoroughbred, Appealing Breeze, in 1989 and he won more stakes than any two-year-old in the country that year. But in the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile, he was hit in the eye by a chip of a rock and missed nearly a year before returning to finish his career, earning more than $600,000.

Despite ongoing success, the Heiligbrodts got out of the business in 2011. Fortunately for them, it didn’t take. “I couldn’t resist getting back into racing,” Heiligbrodt said.

Asmussen has said that he may have saddled more than 1,000 winners for the Heiligbrodts. And if Asmussen surpasses Dale Baird for most career victories in the history of racing, he’ll have the Heiligbrodts to thank.

That’s not bad for a cowboy.

*************************************************

Gatto Racing and All Schlaich Stables - Vasilika…

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