Career Makers - The Role of Jockeys’ Agent

By ED GOLDEN   Manager, mastermind, guru, agent, call him what you will, Colonel Tom Parker was the man who made Elvis Presley.  The King of Rock and Roll’s talent was only exceeded by his raw sex appeal, and Parker, self-proclaimed military officer or not, saw to it that the world would march en masse to a cadence called by Presley’s signature tones.  Elvis died more than four decades ago, but not before he and Parker reached the apex in gold and glory, still yielding riches of infinite proportions all these years later.  In racing, it’s not clothes that make the man; in part it is the agent directing the jockey. Agent and jockey provide a service to trainers, a salesman offering a product.  An agent in this instance is best described as a person empowered to transact business for a jockey. On any given morning at any given track, condition book in hand, there they are, Monty Hall wannabes, ready to make a deal.  A standard arrangement calls for an agent to be paid 25 percent of a jockey’s earnings, but that percentage could vary. If the rider’s services are in great demand, he could pay the agent a smaller percentage. Or, if the agent possesses the persuasive prowess of a Colonel Parker, he could warrant the higher percentage. It’s Economics 101.  Back in the day, agents were not prominent, if in evidence at all. Major stables employed contract riders and in order to ride for an outside trainer, the jockey had to receive permission from his contract stable to do so.  Now, the vast majority of riders have an agent, although jocks on a restricted budget with limited mounts have been known to represent themselves.  Agents wear many hats, including those falling under the Three P’s: politician, psychiatrist, and pacifist, and they can be a boon to racing departments.  “In my career around the country at tracks on both coasts, I’ve worked with agents who mostly helped the racing office,” said Rick Hammerle, Santa Anita’s vice president of racing as well as racing secretary. “We’re both trying to accomplish the same thing: get horses into races. Working with agents and sharing information about trainers’ intentions can help us achieve our goal.”  Even though it’s his first tour as an agent, Mike Lakow has racing’s paradigm of Tom Brady in jockey Javier Castellano, a 40-year-old Venezuelan at the zenith of his career. The reigning four-time Eclipse Award winner, a world class rider be it at Dubai or Churchill Downs, was inducted into racing’s Hall of Fame in 2017.  Still, for an agent, the pressure is always on.  Although he never trained, the 60-year-old Lakow (pronounced LAKE-ow) otherwise has an extensive background enabling him to understand ramifications that simmer just below racing’s surface.  “When I was working as general manager at Hill ‘n’ Dale (a major breeding farm in Kentucky),” he said, “I owned a quarter of one horse, and believe me, it’s a tough deal, so I respect all the owners, as well as trainers.”  Lakow, now based on the East Coast, was racing director at Santa Anita before Castellano hired him in August of 2016. Lakow also was racing secretary for the New York Racing Association (NYRA) from 1993 to 2005, served as a racing official in Florida and Dubai, and was hands-on with horsemen regularly at Santa Anita’s Clockers’ Corner during his sojourn at the historic Southern California track.  “I’m incredibly fortunate to represent Javier,” Lakow said, “because he’s a professional who’s liked by everybody. We have no issues as far as not being able to ride for one trainer or one owner. He’s won four Eclipses, done it all, and now we’re trying to focus on riding the top horses.”  Stress and pressure are standard fare in the workforce, whether you’re Donald Trump unceasingly enduring “fake news” attacks 24/7 or a McDonald’s minimum wage burger slinger serving up $2.50 McPicks. It’s all relative.  That includes Lakow, although he is averse to pointing it out, lest he might be looked upon as a malcontent, what with two chickens in the pot.  “People who see all the money we’re making might wonder how being agent for a top jockey could be stressful, but it is,” Lakow said. “I’ve been in administrative positions in racing for many years, with NYRA and at Santa Anita, but if you happen to make a mistake here and there, you move on.  “It affects the company, but it doesn’t affect an individual. If I happen to make a mistake with Javier, it affects him.  “It’s impossible to keep everybody happy. Any agent will tell you that. Fortunately, Javier is level-headed, so I’m in a good position. That’s not the case with some other jockeys, from what I’ve heard. I respect Javier and Javier respects me, but like I’ve said, it’s impossible to keep everybody happy.  “You try to do the right thing. I respect all the horsemen who give us calls, because it’s a tough game for trainers. Horses will fool you, so I understand the stress trainers and owners face. I don’t look at this as a one-shot relationship.  “Luckily, I have the respect of horsemen because of my work in New York and California. When I started with Javier, horsemen gave me the benefit of the doubt. I was a bit green and I think other agents probably thought, ‘Look at this guy. He starts a job and has a top rider,’ but I’m lucky because I didn’t burn any bridges. I get along with most people and treat everybody with respect. That’s what’s made it so much easier for me.  “In the long run, honesty is the best policy, and I’m always honest. It hurts sometimes, but in the long run, I think it helps.”  Another agent who has been on both sides of the wall is Tom Knust, former racing secretary at Santa Anita and Del Mar, now booking mounts for two-time Kentucky Derby-winning jockey Mario Gutierrez.  “One thing I learned quickly as an agent is that if you have a good rider, it makes things pretty easy, and if you don’t, it’s very, very difficult,” Knust said. “That’s the key, whether you’ve had experience in the racing office or you’ve just come in off the street.  “If you give a call, you want to honor it, although situations develop where you’re in a bind and ask a trainer if he can help you out, but if he doesn’t, you’ve got to keep your word and ride his horse.”  An additional plus comes from riding regularly for a winning trainer, in the case of Gutierrez, that being Doug O’Neill, who saddled I’ll Have Another and Nyquist to capture the Kentucky Derby for principal owner J. Paul Reddam in 2012 and 2016.  “It’s absolutely an advantage, 100 percent, if you have a go-to stable that wins a lot of races, like O’Neill,” Knust said.  As a female, Patty Sterling is in the minority among agents, but with her extensive familial background in racing, she is looked upon as one of the boys.  Her late father, Larry, trained 1978 Santa Anita Handicap winner Vigors and is the father of jockey Larry Sterling Jr. Patty’s uncle, Terry Gilligan, rode and trained, and his brother, also Larry, made his bones as a rider, too. Now 80, he is the quick official at Santa Anita and Del Mar.  “It’s probably a lot easier for a woman in this business than it used to be,” said Patty, 54, a former clocker. “I don’t see that as a problem.  “Being an agent is almost parallel to training horses; it’s very similar. Right now, it seems owners pick the jockeys more so than they ever did before, when trainers were deciding who to ride.”  Ron Anderson has represented a Who’s Who of jockey greats in a career going on four decades: Jerry Bailey, Gary Stevens, Chris Antley, Garrett Gomez, Kent Desormeaux, and current star Joel Rosario among them.  But he is first to admit it’s a combination of variables that produce long-term success. After all, some horses move slower than the hands on a traffic school clock, and into each life, some rain must fall.  “At the end of the day,” said Anderson, like Lakow headquartered on the East Coast, “it’s not jockey racing; it’s horse racing, so the agent and the jockey have to get on the right horse. Generally, a jockey can’t make a horse win. It’s a combination of things, and I’ve been lucky to have represented the right riders.  “The good ones make it easy for you to get on winning horses. People are looking for you and calling for you, instead of the other way around. It makes things much easier when someone’s knocking on your door and you’re not knocking on theirs having to ask or beg them for a chance. That makes it difficult.  “My big break came in 1980, the year I started with Fernando Toro. That was the beginning of two 10-year runs, first with Toro and then with Gary Stevens starting in 1990. When Gary retired the first time, I went to work with Jerry for six years. After that I had Garrett, and Antley at the same time off and on.  “People have asked me what it takes to become a top agent, and there’s no real blueprint to any of this. It’s all about being correct with people, doing the right things by them and remembering that when you answer to a trainer, there’s a trail of people that he has to answer to.  “When you tell him you’re committing to his horse, that information trickles on to a gallop person, an owner, a groom, and hot walkers who are looking forward to and excited about a Bailey or a Stevens or a Rosario riding that horse.  “So an agent has to be very careful, because when he tries to go back over those roads or bridges, it’s going to bite him in the ass unless he keeps people happy. That’s the hardest thing to do for a guy with a top rider: keeping everybody happy by winning; the owner, the trainer, the press, the jock.  “My mentor, if I could say there was one, was Fernando as a jockey and Chick McClellan (late father of current longtime top agent Scotty McClellan). Chick taught me things most people wouldn’t be privy to.”  Scotty, who enjoyed remarkable success with Hall of Fame members Chris McCarron and Alex Solis before taking 28-year-old dynamo Joe Talamo under his wing, still is a tad miffed that his father did not impart all that wisdom to him.  “I wish he wouldn’t have taught Ron so well,” Scotty says, “because he went right to the top.”  Chick’s advice aside, Anderson wasn’t about to choke on humble pie. “At the risk of sounding boastful, I know I’m a really good agent,” he said, “but I’ve been fortunate in being in the right spots, too.  “I’ve won 28 Breeders’ Cup races and 14 Triple Crown races. I’m 63 and plan to keep going as long as I feel well. Who wants to retire in this day and age? We like what we do, so as long as we can make a living and do what we want, it’s all good.”  One thing that enables Anderson to maintain an even keel is his realistic perspective of human nature. He realizes horsemen deal with more than horses.  “First off,” he said, “we’re in a business that if you’re winning at 15 or 20 percent, you’re setting the world on fire, so it’s a lot more negative than positive.  “Second, there is so much more going on in most people’s lives than winning the third race on Friday. It could be turmoil with parents or kids, health issues, problems at work, trouble with spouses, so you’ve got to understand that when you approach people to make a pitch, it’s good to catch them at the right time and not be a source of annoyance.”  McClellan, meanwhile, ranks in the upper echelon of agents thanks to seemingly infinite runs with McCarron and Solis. Now 62, McLellan is on another lengthy streak, this one with Talamo.  “The main thing is to represent a good rider that people want,” McClellan said in explaining his basic philosophy. “The other thing is, you treat them right and be honest and fair . . . you don’t want to end a relationship.”  McClellan represented McCarron for 21 years, “from March 17, 1982, to June 23, 2002,” Scotty said, reeling off the dates like he was reading from a Teleprompter. “We did great together, never could say a bad word about Chris. He never complained, always showed up and was consistent, not that we wouldn’t hit a slump once in a while, but not for very long. Alex and I were together 17 years and 13 or 14 of them were during the same time I had Chris.  “I took Joe’s book when he was 18, so we’re coming up on 10 years. He’s won almost $100 million in purses and has just over 1,800 wins.”  Asked what motivates him, in addition to the money that keeps more than just the wolf away from the door, McClellan said, “It’s exciting. You’re working outdoors with people you’ve dealt with for many years. Winning a Grade 1 race or the Derby is just phenomenal, but winning any kind of race makes you feel good. You’re happy for the connections who have worked so hard to get a win. People don’t realize how much has to go right to do that.  “So many things can go wrong to prevent victory that when everything goes right and you win, it’s great. You go to the barn the next day and everyone is happy. It’s just a good feeling.”  At 73, age is just a number for Tony Matos.  On the chilliest Southern California morning, Matos can be seen pounding the backstretch beat, cargo shorts covering the unexposed portion of his weather-beaten legs, a pair of well-worn kicks on his feet, and a Michelin Man-style down jacket covering him midriff to neck, fending off nippy winds.  It’s a ritual Matos has performed for 50 years. He wouldn’t have it any other way. He has reached racing’s pinnacle, winning the Kentucky Derby six times, with Angel Cordero Jr. twice, on Cannonade (1974) and Bold Forbes (1976); Laffit Pincay Jr. on Swale (1984); Kent Desormeaux aboard Real Quiet (1998) and Fusaichi Pegasus (2000); and Victor Espinoza on War Emblem (2002).  All four jockeys are in the Hall of Fame, in addition to two other former Matos clients, Garrett Gomez and Gary Stevens, and one who despite the fact that he isn’t in, deserves mention, Chuck Baltazar.  “But if it hadn’t been for my first rider, C.H. Marquez, around 1966,” Matos said, “I would have never been an agent. He was riding for my father (Carlos, who bred horses in Puerto Rico), and when I was going to the University of Louisville, Marquez asked me to get him a job in Kentucky and I hooked him up with a couple of trainers, dropped out of college in my last year and became an agent, and here I am.  “Marquez’s son, C.H. Marquez Jr., is my godson, and he’s doing well as a jockey, too.  “I also give a lot of credit to Jack Van Berg. He took a liking to me and I rode a lot of horses for him. It takes a combination of a good agent and good rider to be successful, but basically, if you ride for good people, you’re going to win races.  “There are bumps in the road, but you’ve got to keep people happy. You can’t close any doors. My father always told me as a kid, ‘Be nice to the janitor, because you never know when he’s going to be president.’ You’ve got to be nice to the small people because you never know when they’re going to be on top.”  Matos isn’t planning on slowing down any time soon. “I’ve got a great young apprentice in (Eclipse Award finalist) Evin Roman, I’m healthy, and even though I’m up in age, I feel like a kid. I go the gym every day, keep myself in good shape, and have a good attitude. I’m always the same; I’m very positive.”   “A man is not made for defeat . . . a man can be destroyed, but not defeated.” —Ernest Hemingway.  Bill Sadoo is at the opposite end of the spectrum when it comes to representing internationally recognized and accomplished riders, but that doesn’t diminish the 42-year-old agent’s work ethic or intelligence quotient.  Currently booking mounts for 43-year-old veteran Ignacio (Iggy) Puglisi, Philadelphia-area native Sadoo is a fresh face with a passion that doesn’t grow stale: love of the game.  “I’m a newcomer not only to the world of agenting, but also to Southern California the past three years,” Sadoo said. “I wasn’t worried about being an agent, given my background in the racing industry, but being new to the circuit has been a challenge, making it difficult establishing new relationships and letting people know what my jock has to offer.  “Every rider has his own style, and I focus on accenting the positive with my guy, that’s first and foremost. Unfortunately, the way things are in Southern California right now, opportunities for riders who aren’t perceived to be among the top three or four don’t come often, and if things don’t go as planned, sometimes changes are made and it’s not always the rider’s fault.  “It does test your patience and it can be frustrating, but like everything else in racing, you have to keep your emotions in check and try not to get too high or too low, win or lose.”  Sadoo grew up “the son and grandson of gamblers turned horse owners,” which led to his breaking into the game in the mid-Atlantic region, “first at Penn National and Parx, then branching out to Delaware Park, Gulfstream, Canterbury, Keeneland, and NYRA tracks.  “I got involved in racing before returning in 2007 to Clemson University where I earned a degree in political science,” he said. “I worked for Penn National Gaming as mutuel manager for three years at several of their off-track facilities.”  Caesar Dominguez has been on both sides of the fence, training since 1978 before recently trying his hand as an agent for nine months when his stable dwindled to four horses, his current number now that he’s training again.  Trainers travel the softer road, said the affable Dominguez, 68, who began working for his uncles at age 10 when they trained Quarter Horses in Texas and New Mexico.  “Training is a lot easier, because you have only four or five clients besides your help,” said Dominguez, a native of El Paso. “As an agent, you’re dealing with 200 trainers and for some reason they think you’re trying to take something away from them, and you’re not. You’re trying to provide a service, but if they don’t need you, they don’t always treat you well.  “I hope I wasn’t rude to agents when I was training, because agents have a rough time, they really do. They’re not always well received, unless a trainer needs them. Of course, if you have a Mike Smith, they come and beg you to ride.  “But the average jockey who is struggling and wants to work horses to pick up a mount sometimes is treated like he’s trying to pull the trainer’s teeth. It’s hard to explain to a jockey that if a trainer needs him, he’ll call him. Trainers don’t like agents bugging them, so an agent doesn’t have to be at the barn every day trying to get a mount.  “I had (apprentice) Austin Solis (son of Alex) for eight months, until October of 2017, and we did well, winning 12 races.” For 30 days, Dominguez also represented Martin Garcia (who has since moved his tack to New York), winning six races, including the Grade 3 Precisionist by 14 lengths on Arrogate conqueror Collected and an overnight race on multiple Grade 1 winner West Coast.  Dominguez, 1989 Quarter Horse Trainer of the Year, has resumed training Thoroughbreds full time, but having seen how the other half lives, albeit for the proverbial cup of coffee, he’s not likely to brush off agents any time soon.  At 85, Vince DeGregory is the senior agent in California, and perhaps on the planet. Still sharp as porcupine’s quill and tenacious as a crocodile’s bite, with the recall of a Jeopardy champion, DeGregory began booking mounts in the fall of 1959 at Aqueduct for an unknown kid from Puerto Rico named Angel Cordero Jr.  He turned out to be but one of eight Hall of Fame jockeys DeGregory would represent in a career spanning seven decades, the others being Laffit Pincay Jr., Chris McCarron, Bill Shoemaker, Jorge Velazquez, Jacinto Vasquez, Alex Solis, and Victor Espinoza. He also handled business for Darrel McHargue and Joel Rosario, the latter one day likely to be the ninth DeGregory rider enshrined.  There may be no budding superstars on the horizon for DeGregory these days, but after being sidelined nine months due to back surgery in late September of 2016, he has returned to Southern California’s backstretch in the morning, hawking his wares, despite rejection being the norm more than commitment.  “When a horse gets beat, the first person a trainer blames is the agent, so you have to be thick-skinned,” DeGregory said. “That’s part of our business.”  Agents must be well-versed in reading and understanding the condition book and factoring which horse might be best-suited to win a particular race. They are often as adept at this as trainers.  “We know most of the horses in every trainer’s stable, so when the condition book comes out (usually every two weeks during a long meet) we have a general idea which trainers will have the right horse for a race,” DeGregory said. “We keep records of what horses are eligible for certain races, and we’ll call the racing office to find out for sure, so an agent can be helpful in guiding a trainer to enter a race he might otherwise have overlooked.”  DeGregory’s first jockey was Conn Errico. “Eddie Arcaro got me to go to work for him,” Vince said, “but it was Cordero who had the big future, even though in the beginning he was struggling and no one knew who he was.  “I was having dinner at my dad’s place (DeGregory’s Restaurant in Saratoga Springs, New York) with Arcaro, Shoemaker, and (silver screen star of the 1930s and 40s and future horse owner) Don Ameche and they mentioned Angel’s name. I didn’t know who he was . . . It was (fellow Puerto Rican) Eddie Belmonte who brought him to New York.”  With a rich and captivating tapestry of tales gleaned from icons such as Calumet, Vanderbilt, duPont, and their illustrious ilk, stockpiled from his affiliations through more than half a century of mingling with millionaires and misanthropes alike, Vince DeGregory could author any tell-all memoirs.  But no.  DeGregory has been made offers he  can  refuse. “I could write a book and I could use the money,” he said. “But I won’t.  “The game’s been too good to me.”

By Ed Golden

Manager, mastermind, guru, agent, call him what you will, Colonel Tom Parker was the man who made Elvis Presley.

The King of Rock and Roll’s talent was only exceeded by his raw sex appeal, and Parker, self-proclaimed military officer or not, saw to it that the world would march en masse to a cadence called by Presley’s signature tones.

Elvis died more than four decades ago, but not before he and Parker reached the apex in gold and glory, still yielding riches of infinite proportions all these years later.

In racing, it’s not clothes that make the man; in part it is the agent directing the jockey. Agent and jockey provide a service to trainers, a salesman offering a product.

An agent in this instance is best described as a person empowered to transact business for a jockey. On any given morning at any given track, condition book in hand, there they are, Monty Hall wannabes, ready to make a deal.

A standard arrangement calls for an agent to be paid 25 percent of a jockey’s earnings, but that percentage could vary. If the rider’s services are in great demand, he could pay the agent a smaller percentage. Or, if the agent possesses the persuasive prowess of a Colonel Parker, he could warrant the higher percentage. It’s Economics 101.

Back in the day, agents were not prominent, if in evidence at all. Major stables employed contract riders and in order to ride for an outside trainer, the jockey had to receive permission from his contract stable to do so.

Now, the vast majority of riders have an agent, although jocks on a restricted budget with limited mounts have been known to represent themselves.

Agents wear many hats, including those falling under the Three P’s: politician, psychiatrist, and pacifist, and they can be a boon to racing departments.

“In my career around the country at tracks on both coasts, I’ve worked with agents who mostly helped the racing office,” said Rick Hammerle, Santa Anita’s vice president of racing as well as racing secretary. “We’re both trying to accomplish the same thing: get horses into races. Working with agents and sharing information about trainers’ intentions can help us achieve our goal.”

Even though it’s his first tour as an agent, Mike Lakow has racing’s paradigm of Tom Brady in jockey Javier Castellano, a 40-year-old Venezuelan at the zenith of his career. The reigning four-time Eclipse Award winner, a world class rider be it at Dubai or Churchill Downs, was inducted into racing’s Hall of Fame in 2017.

Still, for an agent, the pressure is always on.

Although he never trained, the 60-year-old Lakow (pronounced LAKE-ow) otherwise has an extensive background enabling him to understand ramifications that simmer just below racing’s surface.

“When I was working as general manager at Hill ‘n’ Dale (a major breeding farm in Kentucky),” he said, “I owned a quarter of one horse, and believe me, it’s a tough deal, so I respect all the owners, as well as trainers.”

Lakow, now based on the East Coast, was racing director at Santa Anita  before Castellano hired him in August of 2016. Lakow also was racing secretary for the New York Racing Association (NYRA) from 1993 to 2005, served as a racing official in Florida and Dubai, and was hands-on with horsemen regularly at Santa Anita’s Clockers’ Corner during his sojourn at the historic Southern California track.

“I’m incredibly fortunate to represent Javier,” Lakow said, “because he’s a professional who’s liked by everybody. We have no issues as far as not being able to ride for one trainer or one owner. He’s won four Eclipses, done it all, and now we’re trying to focus on riding the top horses.”

Stress and pressure are standard fare in the workforce, whether you’re Donald Trump unceasingly enduring “fake news” attacks 24/7 or a McDonald’s minimum wage burger slinger serving up $2.50 McPicks. It’s all relative.

That includes Lakow, although he is averse to pointing it out, lest he might be looked upon as a malcontent, what with two chickens in the pot.

“People who see all the money we’re making might wonder how being agent for a top jockey could be stressful, but it is,” Lakow said. “I’ve been in administrative positions in racing for many years, with NYRA and at Santa Anita, but if you happen to make a mistake here and there, you move on.

“It affects the company, but it doesn’t affect an individual. If I happen to make a mistake with Javier, it affects him.

“It’s impossible to keep everybody happy. Any agent will tell you that. Fortunately, Javier is level-headed, so I’m in a good position. That’s not the case with some other jockeys, from what I’ve heard. I respect Javier and Javier respects me, but like I’ve said, it’s impossible to keep everybody happy.

“You try to do the right thing. I respect all the horsemen who give us calls, because it’s a tough game for trainers. Horses will fool you, so I understand the stress trainers and owners face. I don’t look at this as a one-shot relationship.

Tom Knust

“Luckily, I have the respect of horsemen because of my work in New York and California. When I started with Javier, horsemen gave me the benefit of the doubt. I was a bit green and I think other agents probably thought, ‘Look at this guy. He starts a job and has a top rider,’ but I’m lucky because I didn’t burn any bridges. I get along with most people and treat everybody with respect. That’s what’s made it so much easier for me.

“In the long run, honesty is the best policy, and I’m always honest. It hurts sometimes, but in the long run, I think it helps.”

Another agent who has been on both sides of the wall is Tom Knust, former racing secretary at Santa Anita and Del Mar, now booking mounts for two-time Kentucky Derby-winning jockey Mario Gutierrez.

“One thing I learned quickly as an agent is that if you have a good rider, it makes things pretty easy, and if you don’t, it’s very, very difficult,” Knust said. “That’s the key, whether you’ve had experience in the racing office or you’ve just come in off the street.

“If you give a call, you want to honor it, although situations develop where you’re in a bind and ask a trainer if he can help you out, but if he doesn’t, you’ve got to keep your word and ride his horse.”

An additional plus comes from riding regularly for a winning trainer, in the case of Gutierrez, that being Doug O’Neill, who saddled I’ll Have Another and Nyquist to capture the Kentucky Derby for principal owner J. Paul Reddam in 2012 and 2016.

“It’s absolutely an advantage, 100 percent, if you have a go-to stable that wins a lot of races, like O’Neill,” Knust said.

As a female, Patty Sterling is in the minority among agents, but with her extensive familial background in racing, she is looked upon as one of the boys.

Her late father, Larry, trained 1978 Santa Anita Handicap winner Vigors and is the father of jockey Larry Sterling Jr. Patty’s uncle, Terry Gilligan, rode and trained, and his brother, also Larry, made his bones as a rider, too. Now 80, he is the quick official at Santa Anita and Del Mar.

“It’s probably a lot easier for a woman in this business than it used to be,” said Patty, 54, a former clocker. “I don’t see that as a problem.

“Being an agent is almost parallel to training horses; it’s very similar. Right now, it seems owners pick the jockeys more so than they ever did before, when trainers were deciding who to ride.”


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